You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.
- Maya Angelou

Rest in peace, phenomenal woman.

Celebrate Angelou’s life by reading her poem Phenomenal Woman at http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/178942

1 note

Privacy is not an all-or-nothing issue for users. They want to be able to adjust the dials.

Lee Rainie, director of Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, as quoted in the New York Times.

Get more data and analyis on internet privacy here. Need stats on Facebook? Those are here

(via pewresearch)

136 notes

In a world full of audio visual marvels, may words matter to you and be full of magic.

186 notes

I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and I look at it, until it begins to shine.
― Emily Dickinson

3 notes

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:
1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:

1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

25,838 notes

junkculture:

Anatomical Cross Sections of Human Heads Made from Found Objects and Recycled Materials

62 notes

Congratulations Graduates

image

 

Image Source: http://traveljapanblog.com/ashland/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/126_3069sou-graduation-2012.jpg

 

Weekly Thought Snack: It is graduation season with keynote speakers, academic regalia, family dinners, congratulatory cards, pomp and circumstance. As recent graduates reflect on their educational experience, please enjoy a poem, The School Where I Studied by Yehuda Amichai, that recollects school memories, the potential of learning, and old loves.

 

The School Where I Studied

By Yehuda Amichai

Translated by Chana Bloch and Chana Kronfeld

I passed by the school where I studied as a boy

and said in my heart: here I learned certain things

and didn’t learn others. All my life I have loved in vain

the things I didn’t learn. I am filled with knowledge,

I know all about the flowering of the tree of knowledge,

the shape of its leaves, the function of its root system, its pests and parasites.

I’m an expert on the botany of good and evil,

I’m still studying it, I’ll go on studying till the day I die.

I stood near the school building and looked in. This is the room

where we sat and learned. The windows of a classroom always open

to the future, but in our innocence we thought it was only landscape

we were seeing from the window…

 

To read the rest of the poem, please visit the Poetry Foundation at  http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poem/29872

 

Congratulations graduates. As you strive for success, don’t forget the power and beauty of well-crafted words and images.

 - Caroline (Carrie) Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.

1 note