Always tell what you feel. Do what you think…
― Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

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Gabriel García Márquez by Atonatiuh Bracho.
Website | Facebook
Rest in peace, amazing human being.

Gabriel García Márquez by Atonatiuh Bracho.

Website | Facebook

Rest in peace, amazing human being.

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To elevate the soul, poetry is necessary.
― Edgar Allan Poe

penamerican:

We are Celebrating 10 Years of World Voices! This year’s festival starts April 28th through May 4th! Learn more about this year’s speakers here .

penamerican:

We are Celebrating 10 Years of World Voices! This year’s festival starts April 28th through May 4th! Learn more about this year’s speakers here .

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If I had my life to live over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week.
― Charles Darwin

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Thought Snack of the Week: April is National Poetry Month. Celebrate the creative arts by reading Charles Bukowski’s poem Bluebird and watch an animated interpretation of the poem by Monika Umba at http://youtu.be/jsc3ItAKSLc

 

Bluebird 

By Charles Bukowski

there’s a bluebird in my heart that

wants to get out

but I’m too tough for him,

I say, stay in there, I’m not going

to let anybody see

you.

there’s a bluebird in my heart that

wants to get out

but I pour whiskey on him and inhale

cigarette smoke

and the whores and the bartenders

and the grocery clerks

never know that

he’s

in there.

 

there’s a bluebird in my heart that

wants to get out

but I’m too tough for him,

I say,

stay down, do you want to mess

me up? 

you want to screw up the

works? 

you want to blow my book sales in

Europe? 

there’s a bluebird in my heart that

wants to get out

but I’m too clever, I only let him out

at night sometimes

when everybody’s asleep…

To read the rest of the poem please visit http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/bluebird/ 

 

Support creative and liberal art studies and works! Weekly thought snacks for the week of April will highlight animated poetry.

- Caroline (Carrie) Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.

 

 

Kulturgeschichte: The International English Honor Society at 90

"Kulturgeschichte" is a word to describe the cultural history of something by examining past knowledge, narratives, and traditions. Make sure to gargle the "kul" at the back of your throat and say "schichte" as though you are sneezing.

Go ahead. Give it try.

…That’s right. Bless you.

As I reflect on the 90th Anniversary of the International English Honor Society (Sigma Tau Delta), I wanted to write about the rich history of the organization. Kulturgeschichte was the best word I could find to capture what makes Sigma Tau Delta special. The Society’s exceptionality is so much more than achievements and dates. Rather, it’s also the people, the stories, and the unofficial traces of a dynamic and thriving organizational culture. Although many people view the word culture as a simple descriptor for various values and traditions, the concept of culture is far more inclusive than that. Culture is learned, and the culture of a society shapes the behaviors and consciousness of its members. Sigma Tau Delta has its own culture; a culture characterized by student-centered philosophies, supportive camaraderie, and vibrant academic achievement.

- Caroline (Carrie) Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.

- Read more at: http://www.english.org/sigmatd/publications/newsletter/spring2014/kulturgeschichte.shtml#sthash.IhjnuVNx.dpuf

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If you share the work of others, it’s your duty to make sure that the creators of that work get proper credit. Crediting work in our copy-and-paste age of reblogs and retweets can seem like a futile effort, but it’s worth it, and it’s the right thing to do. You should always share the work of others as if it were your own, treating it with respect and care.

[…]

What if you want to share something and you don’t know where it came from or who made it? The answer: Don’t share things you can’t properly credit. Find the right credit, or don’t share.

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nprbooks:

In Wes Anderson’s latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a writer relates the long and twisting life story of a hotel owner. It’s about youthful love and lifelong obsession, and while the story is original, there’s a credit at the end that reads: “Inspired by the Writings of Stefan Zweig.”

Last month, Anderson told Fresh Air's Terry Gross that until a few years ago, he had never heard of Zweig — and he's not alone. Many moviegoers share Anderson's past ignorance of the man who was once one of the world's most famous and most translated authors.

George Prochnik is out to change that. His forthcoming book is called The Impossible Exile: Stefan Zweig at the End of the World. Check out his conversation with NPR’s Robert Siegel here.

1,401 notes

It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.
― Henry David Thoreau

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